What is collagen?

Key protein of our body

30% of the body's total protein
75% of the protein that makes up the skin

Collagen is the main component of the basic structures of the body and connective tissue. It is a key protein of the body, representing 30% of the total protein of the body and 75% of the protein that makes up the skin. This means that collagen is the key component of the skin and epidermis.
Collagen plays a huge role in the construction of the body because it is responsible for the cohesion, elasticity and reproduction of the skin, the cartilage of the joints and the bones.
Unfortunately, collagen stores are declining over time and even at a rapid rate. From the age of 25 onwards, collagen levels in our body begin to decline normally at a rate of about 1.5% per year. During the process of maturation and later aging, women lose collagen at a faster rate than men.
This so valuable component of our body, unfortunately we can not get it from some kind of food. Therefore, its administration to our body through dietary supplements becomes necessary. By stimulating the body's natural collagen levels, we benefit our joints and bones, while enhancing the elasticity of our skin. Enhancing the collagen of our body has positive effects both on our health and on maintaining a youthful, full of freshness, rejuvenated appearance.

How to increase collagen production

Fibroblasts and chondrocytes are sensitive

Collagen is produced by fibroblasts in the skin and by chondrocytes in the joints. Fibroblasts are connective tissue cells in the skin, which are responsible not only for the production and organization of collagen, but also for the supply of elastin and hyaluronic acid to the skin.
Fibroblasts and chondrocytes are sensitive to natural and chemical stimuli, which can activate and multiply them. Activation of fibroblasts results in increased collagen production.
In other words: Fibroblasts play a leading role in the production of collagen, elastin and hyaluronic acid.

Sources:

1.     Ricard-Blum, S., Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol, 2011. 3(1): 4978.

2.     Krieg, T., Experimental Dermatology, 2011. 20:689-685

What is collagen?

Key protein of our body

30% of the body's total protein 75% of the protein that makes up the skin

Collagen is the main component of the basic structures of the body and connective tissue. It is a key protein of the body, representing 30% of the total protein of the body and 75% of the protein that makes up the skin. This means that collagen is the key component of the skin and epidermis.
Collagen plays a huge role in the construction of the body because it is responsible for the cohesion, elasticity and reproduction of the skin, the cartilage of the joints and the bones.
Unfortunately, collagen stores are declining over time and even at a rapid rate. From the age of 25 onwards, collagen levels in our body begin to decline normally at a rate of about 1.5% per year. During the process of maturation and later aging, women lose collagen at a faster rate than men. This so valuable component of our body, unfortunately we can not get it from some kind of food.
Therefore, its administration to our body through dietary supplements becomes necessary. By stimulating the body's natural collagen levels, we benefit our joints and bones, while enhancing the elasticity of our skin. Enhancing the collagen of our body has positive effects both on our health and on maintaining a youthful, full of freshness, rejuvenated appearance.

How to increase collagen production

Fibroblasts and chondrocytes are sensitive

Collagen is produced by fibroblasts in the skin and by chondrocytes in the joints. Fibroblasts are connective tissue cells in the skin, which are responsible not only for the production and organization of collagen, but also for the supply of elastin and hyaluronic acid to the skin.
Fibroblasts and chondrocytes are sensitive to natural and chemical stimuli, which can activate and multiply them. Activation of fibroblasts results in increased collagen production.
In other words: Fibroblasts play a leading role in the production of collagen, elastin and hyaluronic acid.

The structure of collagen

A single collagen fiber consists of multiple triple helices

A common structural property of collagens is the presence of three polypeptide chains, called α-chains, which form a single helix.
A single collagen fiber consists of multiple triple helices. Each collagen fiber is made up of different types of collagen:

       Collagen type I and III on the skin
       Collagen II and III in cartilage

The diversity of collagen (collagen I, II and III) is mainly determined by the existence of several α-chains (α-chains) with different number of amino acids.
In other words: The more collagen fibers we produce, the better!

The mechanism of collagen formation

A complex process

The mechanism of collagen formation is a complex process. But by learning it we will be able to better understand the importance of collagen for our body, but also the multiple benefits of hydrolyzed collagen.
Initially, genetic information is "read" encoded (transcription process) in DNA and "translated" (translation process) to produce single chains of polypeptides (α-chains).
Each polypeptide chain has a terminal sequence of peptides, also known as a trimerization domain. This region leads to the synthesis of polypeptide chains for the formation of pro-collagen molecules.
Finally, the terminal peptides are cleaved during the maturation process to form collagen.
In other words: The greater the activation of fibroblasts, the more collagen our body produces! The greater the activation of fibroblasts, the more collagen our body produces!

Sources:

1.     Ricard-Blum, S., Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol, 2011. 3(1): 4978.

2.     Krieg, T., Experimental Dermatology, 2011. 20:689-685

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